Toronto Region Related Statistics

  • The GTA made a net contribution (tax revenues less re-investment) of $3 billion to the province of Ontario in 2000 and $17 billion to the federal government that same year
  • Gridlock costs the GTA $2 billion annually in lost productivity
  • Within the past decade alone, the TTC has seem its operating subsidy fall far below that received by any comparable urban centre in the world- from 61 cents to 37 cents per rider
  • Every day over 2.2 million TTC trips are taken
  • Employment in the tourism sector declined by about 8 percent between 1998 and 2000 for a loss of 6800 jobs. During this same time frame, international tourism receipts increased worldwide by 7 per cent and in North America by 15 percent
  • The Toronto region is home to the second highest proportion of immigrants amongst cities, surpassing Sydney, Los Angeles and New York and second only to Miami
  • Between 2011 and 2016, they will account for 100 per cent of the net labour force growth.
  • The waiting list for social housing is about 71,000 households
  • City of Toronto rents rose by 31% between 1997 and 2002
  • Median incomes in Toronto’s 12 poorest neighbourhoods declined by a full 16 per cent in the 1990s. In contrast, the 12 wealthiest neighbourhoods saw their median income rise by 10 per cent.
  • The City of Toronto’s per capita contribution to arts, culture and heritage amounts to $14.64, compared to $17.71 for Vancouver and $26.62 for Montreal
  • In 2002, the Toronto International Film Festival injected $67 million into the local economy
  • Between 1995 and 2001 the provincial allocation for regulated child care decreased by 26% in constant 2001 dollars.
  • In 99-00 the proportion of Toronto elementary schools with a physical education teacher was 52%. In 02-03 it was 43%
  • Average tuition costs at Ontario universities have increased by about $3000 since 1990
  • 34.8 per cent of the City of Toronto’s area is residential; 7.8 per cent is industrial; 2.3 per cent commercial, 7.3 per cent institutional
  • In Toronto the average annual demand of water per day is 1.24 million cubic metres- the volume of the Skydome